Thursday, April 2, 2020

Interview with Temple Of Void done by Patrick posted on 4-2-20



1.Hello please introduce yourself to the readers?How are things going in Detroit these days?
DON:
I play guitar and whammy bar divebombs
ALEX:
I play guitar and stomp on lots of pedals
MIKE:
I do vocals and acoustic stuff.

2.When did you first discover death and doom metal and who were the first bands that caught your attention?Who are some of the current bands that have been listening to?
DON:
A lot of my early exposure to death Metal I owe to the Death Is Only The Beginning III compilation.
That was where I first heard Dissection, Benediction, Dismember and Divine Eve among others. Lately, Katatonia has been in constant rotation for me. My Dying Bride’s new LP is one of my favorites of this year so far; and the new Tombs release “Monarchy of Shadows” is great as well.
ALEX:
For me, the first doom band I really got into was Paradise Lost circa “Icon.” And it’s no coincidence
they are still a huge influence on me to this day. As for death metal...I discovered it when I lived in Scotland and would watch a show called Raw Power. I remember hearing Carcass and Morbid Angel for the first time and just being blown away with the darkness of it all. It was so fucking extreme to hear for the first time. But it was initially bands like Paradise Lost that caught me ear more because of the sorrowful melody that just moved mountains in my mind.
Recently I’ve been listening to Vadiat,
Vastum, Ossuary, Malignant Altar, and Warp Chamber.
MIKE:
I too discovered a lot of my earliest Death Metal bands through old label compilations and reading
album liner notes and thanks lists. I checked out Cannibal Corpse because I saw them in Ace Ventura. I got into Doom from Black Sabbath and looking for other bands that channeled that same energy. Stuff I’ve liked recently are the debuts from Thundersson,
and Prelude to Ruin. I’m also digging the new material from Angel Sword, Rotting Kingdom, Freeways, Cemetery Filth, and Malokarpatan.

3.Temple Of Void was formed in 2013 when did you and the other members get the idea
to start this band?Are you satisified with how everything has gone with the band over the years?

ALEX:
TOV was started by myself and Eric Blanchard. He is our original guitarist. He and I respected
each other as guitarists and knew we had to work together when the time was right. We started something, I called Brent to play bass and Eric got us Jason and Mike (on drums and vocals). Things gelled and it’s been a fantastic working relationship. I personally
couldn’t be happier. When Eric left we brought in our first choice, Don Durr, to play guitar. We’ve just been going from strength to strength with each release. I couldn’t ask to be in a band with a better bunch of dudes. I’m personally very satisfied with the trajectory of the band, but we continue to strive for more.

4.Who would you say are the bands biggest influences and have they remained the same over the years?For the readers who have never heard Temple Of Void how would you best describe the bands style?
ALEX:
Bolt Thrower, Morbid Angel, Asphyx, Cannibal Corpse, Katatonia, Paradise Lost, My Dying Bride,
Anathema, Deicide, Alice in Chains, Failure, Hawkwind, Immolation, Gorguts, Neurosis, Burzum, Edge of Sanity, Machine Head (Burn My Eyes), Death, Godflesh, Swervedriver...
The easiest way for me to describe
our sound is if you took European doom and mixed it with American death. You’ve got the riffs and cold vibes of Katatonia and Paradise Lost mixed with the headbanging old school riffage of early Deicide, Cannibal Corpse, and Morbid Angel. That gets you in
the ballpark but it doesn’t really allow for the nuances we bring as Temple of Void. There’s a space-odyssey type of vibe to our sound that’s reminiscent of Hawkwind or krautrock. It all sounds weird on paper but we know what we’re doing and how to blend it
to create our signature sound.
I don’t think our influences have
strayed much over the years, to be honest. We bring new stuff in but I don’t think we’ve ever lost site of the influences. If we don’t have Asphyx / Bolt Thrower style riffs on our album then something’s gone wrong!

5.The World That Was is the bands third full-length how long did it take the band to write the music for the new release?Does the whole band take part in the writing process or does one member usually write everything?
DON:
We spent most of 2019 writing and recording The World That Was. Our writing environment is always collaborative. Riffs and small skeletons of songs are brought to rehearsals by Alex or myself. From there we all work on those ideas together; experimenting with tempos, placement, structure and so on.

6.Who usually handles writing the lyrics and what are some topics written about on the newest release?Which usually comes first the music or the lyrics?
MIKE:
Typically the band flushes out the musical ideas and relays them to me as a rough structure
and I develop patterns and lyrics from there. It works because I’m able to listen closely to the song and build off whatever vibe it gives me and ideas it inspires.

7.What have been some of Temple Of Void's most memorable shows over the years?And who are some bands you have had the opportunity to share the stage with?
DON:
Psycho Las Vegas in 2018 was definitely a highlight. The
Maryland Deathfest pre party show in 2017 was also a lot of fun, and ended up being the first show that I played with the band.
ALEX:
ShadowWoods Fest was awesome. We played in the woods. Camped out. It was really secluded and
a really great vibe away from the hustle and bustle of city life. Really cool experience.
MIKE:
One of my favorite memories was doing a short run of shows with Cemetery Filth a handful of
years back. Those were some of the first shows we played that were out of Michigan, and it was cool getting to know those guys.


8.Has the band ever made a music video for any of their songs if yes what song was it?Would you like to make a video for any of the bands newest songs?If yes which song?

DON:
We just released a video for the track “Self-Schism” from the new album. We did a couple days
of filming that included a snowy Saturday evening in the Michigan woods. We’re all very pleased with how it turned out.

ALEX:
Our first video was for “Savage Howl” off our debut album. We didn’t get around to shooting
one for anything off of Lords of Death.

9.Besides the upcoming The World That Was release are the bands past releases still available for the readers to purchase?Besides physical releases does the band have any other merchandise currently available if yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it?

ALEX
We have a very robust bandcamp site where we sell shirts, hoodies, pins, patches, sweatpants,
shorts, stickers, hats, and music on CD, tape, or digital. It’s
templeofvoid.bandcamp.com. We update it with new merch regularly. We often run ideas past our fans and have them vote for what they’d like to see put into production.

10.What does Underground Metal mean to you and how do you feel the Underground Metal scene has changed over the years?

MIKE:
To quote an excellent record by the band Hawaii: “One Nation Underground.” It doesn’t really matter what “scene” you’re from, whether it’s the death metal underground or some other faction of metal, punk, grindcore, etc. We’re all here because we possess some level of free-thinking. We’re not content with what is simply
marketed to us by major labels and publications; especially with genres like death metal who have a clearly definite glass ceiling that limits any sort of commercial potential. We’re all artists, musicians, promoters, and fans. We all work together to make
sure we can create, tour, and thrive without support of the masses.

11.Temple Of Void comes out of Michigan's metal scene what are your thoughts of the scene in Michigan over the years?

MIKE:
Michigan is, and always will be, a musical powerhouse. We set the foundation for punk and hi-energy rock and roll with The Stooges and the MC5. We perfected the science of pop songwriting and brought soul and R&B to the masses with Motown. Industrial cities like Flint gave us Grand Funk Railroad, who stole the show from almost every national act they played with, and later on they gave us Repulsion who are arguably one of the first extreme metal/grindcore acts. Mid-Michigan produced some of the earliest USBM bands with Masochist and Wind of the Black Mountains releasing demos as early as 1992. There’s a continued legacy of pushing boundaries, testing extremes, and taking chances.

12.Who are your all-time favorite bands coming out of Michigan over the years?And are their any new bands that have caught your attention that you feel the readers should check out soon?

DON:
There’s been some great bands that have come from our state; Saprogenic, Bluesong, and Konkeror are just a few who’ve released some great music over the years but have all ceased to exist. Anyone looking for active Michigan bands should check out Fell Ruin,
Isenblast, Centenary, and Portal of Pazuzu.

ALEX:
Bluesong is hands-down my favorite band from Michigan. They could have been huge if they had
lasted longer.

MIKE:
Besides the obvious aforementioned ones; Steel Vengeance, Medieval, Fatal, Lucifer’s Hammer,
Halloween, Coven 13, Summon and Reaper.

In regards to more recent bands in
the scene: Sauron, Wastelander, Reaper, Anguish, Perversion, Demon Bitch/White Magician, Dungeon Beast, Cruthu...there’s so much good stuff if you’re willing to dig.

13.Besides working in Temple Of Void do any of the members currently play with any other bands or solo projects? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?

ALEX:
I do a metal/punk band called Hellmouth, but we’ve been on hiatus for a couple years. Still
great friends. We haven’t broken up. But after three albums and twelve years we’re just laying low for now. We’ll surface again some day.

MIKE:
I play guitar in the bands Acid Witch and Nuke. I’m always writing whether it’s for a band I’m
currently in or something I’d like to do in the future.

14.When
you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you enjoy doing in your free time?

DON:
I have a home studio that I record and mix bands in; I also work as a live sound engineer and tour with bands when I am able to. I have a small record label that I started up last year as well.

ALEX:
The gym. All things Warhammer. Reading. Fantasy. Hanging with my wife and kid.
MIKE:
I like to stay creative in general. I enjoy drawing and painting. I like watching movies and
reading. I occasionally play retro video games, tabletop games and CCGs.

15.Thank
you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?

ALEX:
May all your hits be crits.



Cheers,
Alex & Temple of Void
Band Contacts
https://templeofvoid.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/TempleOfVoid
https://www.youtube.com/user/TempleOfVoid
https://www.instagram.com/templeofvoid/


Interview with Cemetery Filth done by Patrick posted on 4-2-20



1.Hello how are things going with you this week?Please introduce yourself to the readers?
Cheers Patrick, things are going as well as they can be, thanks. I hope you and your readers are staying as healthy and safe as possible.
I'm Matt Kilpatrick, band-leader, vocalist, and one of the lead guitarists for the Cemetery Filth.

2.At what age did you first discover death metal and who were the first bands you heard?Who are some of the current bands that have caught your attention?
I probably first heard death metal in 2003 or early 2004 when I was 14 years old. I was lucky though, I had a high school teacher who was into the metal scene in the late 80's and early 90's. so he would loan me CD's from his own collection during school-days. The first death metal album he lent me was Death's "Human" - and I'm not going to lie, it was far beyond what my young ears could comprehend at first haha. Over time I kept borrowing it and "unlocking" its secrets, and soon came to love it. Cynic (a favorite of his), Morbid Angel, Atheist, Immolation, Suffocation, and others soon followed.
Some of my favorite current bands are Church of Disgust from FL/TX - they just released an amazing 3-track EP. I'm also a big fan of Molder from the Chicago area. Our long-time brothers, Ectovoid, are a big favorite. And we are lucky to share a label with bands like Nucleus and Shards of Humanity who both crush. Ectoplasma from Greece rules, as does the mighty Obliteration from Norway. I recently heard a track from a new band called Leprophiliac which was really cool! Excited to hear more from them.

3.Cemetery Filth was started back in 2014 when did you all get the idea to start this band?How did you choose Cemetery Filth as the name of the band?
I had been dreaming of doing a band like this since not long after getting into Death and the other bands that first introduced me to the musical stylings of death metal. I met our old bassist online through a mutual friend in Atlanta, and he introduced me to our old drummer, and to other band-leader / lead-guitarist, Ryan Guinn. We all knew we wanted to make death metal that showed a new interpretation of the releases we all worshiped for years. Our old bassist had come up with the name and suggested using it for the project - it was too fitting to not get used.

4.What is the current line-up of the band?Who would you say are the bands biggest influences?
The current line-up in addition to me is co-founder Ryan Guinn on lead guitar, Devin Kelley on bass and backing vocals, and Chris McDonald on drums. Our biggest influences are bands like Death, Morbid Angel, Autopsy, Obituary, Pestilence, Cannibal Corpse, Immolation, Suffocation, Benediction, Sinister, Malevolent Creation, Monstrosity, Carcass.... you get the picture. 

5.Dominion is the bands debut full-length how long did it take the band to write the music for the debut?Does the whole band take part in the writing process or does one member usually write everything?
It took us about a year or so to get most of the songs together for the album. We are spread out between four different states so our time together is very small. I think we got to practice maybe 6-8 times total with Chris on drums before we cut the album - and most of those practices were spent piecing together songs. "Devoured By Dread" was written way back in 2015 and a couple of other songs were being worked on in 2017. But most of the album was written in the past year. Ryan and myself, the two guitarists, write most of the music. Devin contributed a few cool riffs to the album as well, and Chris typically comes up with drum patterns and fills based on the music we show him, but he suggested some really cool ideas as well that really brought the album together.

6.Who usually handles writing the lyrics and what are some topics you wrote about on the debut release?Which usually comes first the lyrics or the music?
I write all of the lyrics for the band. It's not really by choice, but out of necessity, as I find that I remember my own lyrics best, and it's easier for me to write my own vocal patterns and lyrics to the music. The music almost always comes first, but there are some times when the "ideas" behind the lyrics, or a song title can shape the song's music as it is being written. Lyrically, this album is a mixed bag. We have some songs that deal with the reality around us, some that tell tales of fictional and mental horror, and others that speak in metaphors.

7.Does Cemetery Filth get to play live very often?What have been some of the bands most memorable shows over the years?
We definitely do not get to play as live as we would like. As we've gotten older, our responsibilities have increased, and that reduces our ability to get together even more than our separate locations already create. We are thankful to have such an awesome "home town" scene in Atlanta though, and we are able to play shows as often as we can there. Our most memorable shows were opening for Monstrosity and Hellwitch in 2016, playing with Deicide that same year, our two back-to-back shows with Exhumed were pretty maniacal as well. Out of the Fests that we have played, I would definitely say Blood Of The Wolf III in 2017 was the wildest we've played.

8.Are their any shows or tours planned in support of the debut Dominion?If yes where will the band be playing and who are some bands you will share the stage with?
We had a release show booked with Sadistic Ritual, Malformity, and Shards Of Humanity, but it has been postponed due to the Covid-19 virus scare. Unfortunately that has also hurt the chances of us getting to tour this summer and Fall. We're still hoping we can do something, but with how uncertain things are right now, it's hard to know what will befall us.

9.Besides the debut release coming out are the bands previous EP and splits still available for the readers to purchase?Besides physical releases does the band have any other merchandise currently available if yes what is available and where can the readers buy it?
I believe our label, Unspeakable Axe Records, has copies of the first 4 Doors To Death split still available! He may still have copies of our 7" split with Sewercide available as well. We have a few copies left as well that we would gladly sell to somebody. We've got some t-shirt designs available as well, and hopefully more soon once the Covid-19 scare dies off and shows start happening again. You can e-mail us at cemeteryfilth-AT-gmail-DOT-com for any merch inquiries and we will get back to you with what we've got available!

10.What does Underground Metal mean to you?
Underground metal means the world to me. Sometimes I get sick of the underground and all of the pretentious drama that invokes the "scene". But I wouldn't be who I am today... hell, I may not even be here today, without the metal underground. It's what gave us the bands that evolved into death metal - it's where death metal returned to after the initial semi-commercial breakthrough of the genre in the early 90's. It is truly the home for death metal and death metal maniacs alike. We thrive here. We created it. We feed it. We nurture it. And in spite of how toxic some individuals can be for it, it persists, and grows. The metal underground is a "home" to me and underground metal is necessary, even if it sucks. Feeding it in any capacity, with good or bad music, keeps it going.

11.When you need you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you like to do in your free time?
I'm big into hiking, or when I can't get out of the city, I go on long walks around my neighborhood. I also like to listen to records, watch sitcoms or movies with my lady, and generally enjoy hanging out, grilling, having some drinks with friends. Just chilling. I'm a pretty low-key person and often describe myself as a hermit. Going out to shows though is definitely fun, and something I feel fortunate to have in my city.

12.Besides working in Cemetery Filth do you or any of the members currently work with any other bands or solo projects?If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
As of right now, Devin our bassist, and Chris our drummer, have the most going on on the sidelines. Devin is the band leader of blackened death/thrash band, Dire Hatred, and also fronts a thrash band. Chris is a very busy dude and is a main songwriter in almost all of his other projects - Ectovoid, Seraphic Entombment, Hegemony, and an especially sick new project, Exaugurate. Ryan hopes to start a traditional metal project sometime soon, and I've been writing some traditional Maryland-style doom metal in my spare time for a future side project.

13.Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?
Thank you for taking the time to interview us! We're very happy to be part of this, and to contribute. Thanks to all of the readers and metal maniacs that keep the underground alive! Let's keep giving praise to the bands that really riff and push death metal forward - stop glorifying the fakers.
M A T T K I L P A T R I C K
Band Contacts
Label Contacts

Saturday, March 28, 2020

Xpus--In Umbra Mortis Sedent cd{Transcending Obscurity Rec.} done on 3-25-20



Xpus--In Umbra Mortis Sedent cd{Transcending Obscurity Rec.}
Coming out of the Italian old school death metal scene is Xpus with their second full length release.In Umbra Mortis Sedent.The new release contains eight tracks with a intro and outro the music is played with mid paced tempoed musical patterns. the musicians do speed up to a faster pace throughout some of the tracks.The guitar work and drums are played with a lot of skill and well written passages.The vocals are old-school death metal growls that are done with a lot of powerful vocals and fit Xpus's music perfectly.If you are a fan of early deicide,Obituary with the bands ability to write quality death metal then be sure to pick up a copy of In Umbra Mortis Sedent when it is released.
                                                                               Band Contacts
                                                                         https://www.facebook.com/xpus666/
                                                                               Label Contacts
                                                                          https://tometal.com/
                                                                      https://transcendingobscurity.bandcamp.com/
                                                                 https://www.facebook.com/transcendingobscurityrecords
                                                                  https://twitter.com/transcendingobs

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Interview with Architectural Genocide posted on 3-11-20



1. Please introduce yourselves to the readers.

Hi, readers! Nat, Matt, Dan, and Jonathan here, and we are Architectural Genocide! Could that have sounded any more Captain Planet?

2. Hello, how are things going in Texas this week?

Matt: Texas is ight. Lots of construction, traffic because of the construction, sporadic weather, and, you know, killer death!

3. What age were you when you first discovered death metal, and who were the first bands you heard? Who are some current bands that have caught your attention?

Dan: I started listening to metal at the age of 10 and got into death metal when I was 15. This was around the beginning of the MySpace era, back when brutal death bands would reach out to you, thank you for the add, and tell you to keep it brutal! You bet your goddamn ass I kept it brutal because I started discovering bands like Devourment, Incantation, Digested Flesh, and the Berzerker. They put a little lead in my pencil, if you know what I mean.

These days, Italy has been pumping loads all over the death metal community. With bands like Septycal Gorge, Antropofagus, Indecent Excision, Blasphemer and Hour of Penance, you can’t really go wrong.

Laying it down in the Texas region, you have elites like Flesh Hoarder, Reviled, Demonseed, Defiled Crypt, Putrid Womb, and Necrosis. Lots of great death metal in the continent-sized state that is Texas.

4. Architectural Genocide was formed in 2017, when did you and other members first get the idea to start this band? How did you choose Architectural Genocide as the name of the band?

Nat: Dan and Jonathan had been trying to put together a project since 2015. Jonathan started with jamming with me in late 2017. Jonathan came out to a sesh my friend and I were having. I could instantly tell he was a thicc ass boy. He was ready to work so we got after it. We started getting together every weekend. As things progressed, Jonathan came over during the week, and sometimes he would even spend the night. Soon enough, I asked for Jonathan’s hand in marriage and slowly put together what you see and hear now.

5. Cordyceptic Anthropomorph is the band’s debut which is being release through Comatose Music, when did you and the band first come in contact with this label?
Matt: Jonathan has a long-standing relationship with Comatose Music given his previous project released music on the label. When we received the premixed tracks, we sent them to the label in September. They immediately got back to us and they said they loved what we were doing. With a label like Comatose Music that’s so strongly planted into the death metal community, how could we pass that up? They offered the deal, and we took it.

6. Does the whole band take part in the writing process or does one member usually write everything? How long does it usually take to complete one song?
Nat: Jonathan and I write a lot of the content and bring it to Matt and Dan. They give their input and we go from there. Dan and I collaborate on lyrics and vocal rhythms.
Completing a song varies. Sometimes, it can take a couple of hours. Other times, we can work on a track for weeks.

7. Besides the debut does the band have any other merchandise currently available or coming out soon? If yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it?
Dan: Merchandise can be found at architecturalgenocide.bandcamp.com and through our label at comatosemusic.com. We’re in the process of working out a deal with NASA to ensure those not on Earth get their fix, too! We gotchu, ET!

8. Has Architectural Genocide had the chance to play very many live shows over the years or do you prefer working in the studio?
Jonathan: We’ve played a handful of shows so far. We’re grateful for the offers we’ve received. We’ve already had the privilege of playing one of Texas’ premiere metal fests, Building Temples from Death Fest, and we’ve been able to open up for some of the sickest names in death metal. Matt, Dan, and I love the live performance element, and Nat gets his excitement from the writing process.
Our plan was to track an album first, then play the live shows in support of the release. But we received an offer to play Building Temples from Death Fest 2018, and we didn’t want to turn it down. We rushed to track a 2-song demo to have for the event because we wanted a little something to show people what we’re about. After that, we decided to keep the train moving and play some shows while finishing writing the rest of the debut release. Once the full length was done, we stopped taking offers for shows and focused solely on the release.

9. Are there any tours or shows planned in support of the debut release? If yes where will the band be playing and who are some bands you will be sharing the stage with?
Nat: So far, we’ve been confirmed for this year’s Chicago Domination Fest this summer. That’s going to be a wild one! This year’s lineup includes names like: Devangelic, Vile, Party Cannon, Condemned, Created to Kill, and Virulent Excision; very stoked for this. We may or may not be making our way out to Sin City sometime this year. *wink, wink*
We just played our CD Release Party here in Houston in with Flesh Hoarder, Defiled Crypt, Orchiectomy, and Scrap Pile. We packed the place for a night of delectable death metal, drunken antics, and endless pitting. We couldn’t have asked for a better turnout!

10. Architectural Genocide comes out of the Texas brutal death metal scene what is your opinion of the scene in Texas over the years?
Jonathan: We feel like it comes and goes at times here in Houston, but there is always something going on. Dallas/Ft Worth has a pretty steady stream of brutal death bands, and all the major cities have their share of heavy hitters. There have definitely been some iconic bands come out of Texas over the years, and we are happy to carry on the legacy.

11. Who are your all-time favorite bands coming out of Texas and are there any new bands you feel the readers should check out soon?
Jonathan: Infernal Dominion is a name that comes to our minds rather quickly, as well as Insideous Decrepancy. Everyone knows about Devourment, and there is Scattered Remains, too.
As far as bands to check out, go jam Toluca from San Antonio. I dig their sound a lot.

12. When you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you like to do in your free time?
Matt: I’m into all forms of melting of the mind, if you catch my drift. Nat partakes in strength training, he favors hanging out with cats over humans, and he is an avid World of Warcraft player. When Jonathan isn’t writing riffs, he hangs with his daughter. Our guttural goliath known as Dan is a vinyl collector, console gamer, and family man.

13. Besides playing in Architectural Genocide do you or any of the members currently play in any other bands?
Jonathan: Nat has a few side projects he works on in some of his downtime, but we are all pretty focused on this band’s momentum.

14. Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final words for the readers?
Dan: We hope everyone checks out the release and spreads the word of Architectural Genocide. We hope you’re digging what we’re putting down!
CORDYCEPTIC ANTHROPOMORPH OUT MARCH 13th ON COMATOSE MUSIC!

Matt, Nat, Dan, and Jonathan: See you in the pit!
Band Contacts
https://www.facebook.com/architecturalgenocide/
https://architecturalgenocide.bandcamp.com/merch
Label Contacts
http://www.comatosemusic.com/
https://comatosemusic.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Comatosemusiclabel

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Interview with Nerve Saw done by Patrick posted on 3-8-20


Interview with Nerve Saw done by Patrick

1.Hello how are things going in Finland these days? Please introduce yourself to the readers?
 Hi there! My name is Markus Makkonen and I handle bass and vocals in Nerve Saw currently. Being on AWOL are Heikki Matero, our guitar player and Michael Dorrian, who played drums on our debut album.
Things in Finland are quite alright, at the moment. We’ve had a pretty warm winter, as it has been south wind throughout. That has meant a lot of ice, cold rain and slush. None of that typical 10-20 minus degrees celsius we usually have at this time of the year. Today it has been pretty nice, though. Fresh snow, nice minus 8 degrees and sun is shining again, after it being mainly away for December-January. So, yeah, I’m enjoying it in here right now. Going to town to buy some records this Saturday too, so it’s all good. 

2.When did you first start listing to death metal music and who were the first bands you heard?
- This would be in the early and mid-90’s. I was into Finnish punk bands at first, then discovered thrash metal. After I had got as far as Sepultura and Slayer, it was pretty easy to jump into realms of Morbid Angel from there. So, Morbid Angel were the first proper death metal band I heard, with Obituary, early Amorphis, early Sentenced, Edge of Sanity and Napalm Death soon on their wake.

3.When did you first get the idea to start Nerve Saw and are you happy with how everything is going with the band?
- I started Nerve Saw out in 2010 already. Around the time the band I was playing in, and I still am too, Sadistik Forest was heading to more a technical kind of death metal maybe. I had just read the brilliant Choosing Death book by Albert Mudrian and was listening a lot of very early death metal because of it. Early Carcass, Master / Death Strike, Napalm Death, Obituary and Six Feet Under… My teenage greats! So, I wanted to have a channel to write some of that mid-tempo “pick up truck” death metal as well, not just the technically advanced stuff. This is how Nerve Saw got started. I did an EP in 2011 and the band got signed by a certain label too, who did not release anything from Nerve Saw unfortunately. The EP was buried in the vaults for years, until it was dug up and released via Old Skull Productions a couple of years back. While that recording was laying in the shelves I was busy with Sadistik Forest and Hooded Menace. All this time I had Nerve Saw in mind as well. Only problem was the fact that there was more and more old school death metal coming out, lot of it sounding quite the same. So, I did not want to release any more of that. Wanted to find a fresh angle instead. At some point I realized that Nerve Saw needed to rewind back in time to early 90’s again, as far as the influences go and melt some punk stuff into death metal format. To find a refreshed sound. And here we are. Debut album is coming out in March via very good label, Testimony Records. The record turned out pretty neat and the band is very happy about it and how things are taking shape in general.

4.Who would you say are the bands biggest influences and for the readers who have never heard the band how would you best describe the bands sound?
- Somebody said that Nerve Saw in 2020 sounds like At the Gates playing GBH and I can understand where that is coming from. There’s the death metal thing, yes, but there is a lot of that 1980’s / 1990’s punk and hardcore thing involved as well. The sounds were done in similar fashion as bands from Sweden in early 1990’s used to do them, but the songs are all fresh and not a bit retro. So, I think the result turned out to be somewhat timeless. It does not belong to any decade in particular.
- While we were writing the album there was a myriad of things we were listening. Whereas I tried to conjure up the energetic, unstoppable vibes of bands like Motörhead, Disfear, Celtic Frost, but also some hardcore and punk riffs like Discharge, Terveet Kädet and Musta Paraati, Heikki was into Raised Fist like he always is and Mike was listening his own favorites, namely Suicidal Tendencies, Death and Cynic. In a way Peril became a mix of all these elements, put into a bucket, shaken and then stirred with HM-2 distortion.

5.Peril is the bands debut full-length which will be released through Testimony Rec. When did you first come in contact with this label?
- After the album was mastered and complete, we started sending out promos. Testimony Records was one of the very first, as we thought they were handling everything very well and had impressive distribution too. So, we did not even get to finish our list of labels, when Testimony Records contacted us and things took off pretty fast from there on.

6.How long did it take to write the music for the debut release? How long does it usually take to complete one song?
 - I think the songs for Peril were written, rehearsed and recorded within a radius of one year, or one and a half in maximum. Some of the songs in the album were written pretty quickly, in a matter of hours, some took a little longer to take shape, but one can write stuff like this pretty quickly. You need a good idea first and after it, just find the right notes and vibes to match it.

7.Besides the upcoming Peril release does the band have any other merchandise currently available? If yes what is available and where can the readers buy it?
- Our EP, Call of the Casket, can be bought via Old Skull Productions and we are about to do some t-shirts as well in the future. Keep your eyes open and follow the Facebook site of Nerve Saw for them. 

8.Does Nerve Saw play live very often or do you prefer to work in the studio? What have been some of the bands most memorable shows so far?
- To this day, Nerve Saw has not played live a single show yet. In the beginning I was playing all the instruments anyway so that made playing live impossible, but as we have a full band now the live aspect is an option too. Every member of the band has been playing metal since 1990’s, so we all have played lots of shows already, during 20 + years. Therefore we have not rushed with the live thing, but if we get asked to play an interesting show somewhere, there’s no reason why we could/would not do it.

  9.Are their any tours or shows planned in support of the debut release? If yes where will the band be playing and who are some bands you will share the stage with?
- We are still waiting for that phone call. Hahah!

 10.What does Underground Metal mean to you?
- A lot. Without a doubt. Have been dealing with the underground metal scene since the mid-1990’s. First here in Finland and for more than a decade internationally as well. Underground death metal scene around the world is a fantastic bunch of people, with similar mindset, values and goals. It is easy to get  along with everybody, no matter where the person is from and there are no rock star wannabes in death metal bands either. All this makes underground scene a brotherhood I’m glad to be a part of.

 11.Nerve Saw comes out of Finland's death metal scene what is your opinion of the Finnish death metal scene?
- We have great bands in here, but not too many venues where to play. Death metal has never been very popular in here, even we have a history of quality death metal. First in the beginning of 1990’s and now again. I guess all the Finnish death metal is more popular OUTSIDE Finland than here in our home grounds. Finnish bands have always tried to avoid direct copying, rather come up with a different twist for each band instead. We have had slow bands, fast bands, death ‘n roll and plain bizarre stuff as well. Melodic and plain ugly stuff. This makes Finnish death metal interesting, but maybe a bit hard to categorize at the same time.

12.Who are your all-time favorite bands coming out of Finland and are their any new bands you could recommend to the readers?
- My favorite band from here was Sentenced. Their early death metal stuff pretty much set the standard and was a fan of their later, more goth albums too. But the pinnacle of Finnish metal still has to be Demilich. They are one of a kind band in the world. The fact that they did only one album in 1993 and are still playing shows over it speaks volumes of their quality. You really do not meet nicer people, either.
- Of new bands coming from Finland, I’d like to mention God Disease, Lantern and Cumbeast, at least, but the album everybody should look into would be Realm of Ash and Blood by Solothus. I’ve heard the record and it is actually coming out the very same day as the Nerve saw album is. What these lads have done is simply marvelous. Mind-blowing, jaw dropping stuff. Atmospheric too, still brutal. By far the best death metal album that has come out from Finland in years and years! Be forewarned! 

13.Besides working Nerve Saw do you currently work with any other bands or solo projects? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
- I play bass and do vocals in Sadistik Forest. We have a new EP coming out this year, so watch out! Mike  also plays guitar and does vocals in Anatomy of I. So, besides being our drummer, he is an exceptional all around musician. If he goes and records with Dirk Verbeuren and Steve DiGiorgio, it really should not be a surprise even. Hahah!

14.When you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you like to do in your spare time?
- I’d like to take a moment of rest now and then… And have a beer maybe. Hahah! But that is proving to be difficult. Besides family and work routines, I’m also wrapping up a book about Finnish death metal. Have had it under works for a couple of years, but that should be finished real soon. More news about that will follow pretty soon, I guess. So, watch out again!

 15.Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?
- Thanks for having Nerve Saw onboard! Always a pleasure and an honor, if somebody takes a moment to listen and think about the noise we are making. To all the people reading this, stay safe, don’t buy everything you hear for a truth, but think with your own brains instead. Fear no beer, keep on supporting the extreme metal scene and please – give our debut album a listen when it’s out!
Band Contact
Label Contacts







Saturday, February 29, 2020

Interview with Wardaemonic done by Patrick posted on 2-29-20

Interview with Wardaemonic done by Patrick

1.Hello how is life in Australia this week?Please introduce yourself to the readers?
Greeting, Australia is hot, as always. We're nearly at the end of summer, but it's bringing no respite.
I am Maelstrom, Drummer and vocalist from Wardaemonic. Blitz plays bass and synth programming, Anharat on lead guitar and Bane on (live) voice and guitar.

2.When did you first discover black metal music and who were the first bands you listened to?Are their any current bands that have caught your attention?
Personally, i discovered black metal in about 1998, a couple of years after the glorious second wave rose to notoriety. My first exposures to it were on the internet, using primitive sharing facilities, such as Audio Galaxy and MIRC chat rooms. I think i first heard Burzum and Cradle Of Filth to begin with, I remember not liking it straight away. As with all good things, it took a while to develop a taste for. Things you are drawn to straight away are often discarded once they've become too repetitive and stale.
In terms of modern black metal, the tastes within the band's personal are all quite varied, so we listen to a broad variety of stuff. The most recent album i've acquired in the genre was probably Borknager's "True North", I don't keep 100% up to date with everything that's released, it takes time for things to trickle through.

3.Wardaemonic was formed in 2005 when did you and the other members first get the idea to start this band?How did you choose Wardaemonic as the name of the band?
We were formed in 2005 by the band's original guitarist Regnator, who left us in 2012. He's still alive, just not playing in the band anymore. He recruited myself on drums, Anharat on guitar and Blitz on bass, where we've stayed ever since. We haven't undergone as many lineup shifts as other bands of such tenure, but the lineup has been solid now since 2012. I'm not sure where the original idea for the band came, but I believe it's intent has shifted focus slightly in that time, whilst remaining true to the vision. Everyone brings their different influences to the band, contributing to make something greater than the sum of it's parts.
The name is derived from that of an 'inner guiding spirit', although we take the name to it's logical conclusion.

4.Who would you say are the bands biggest influences and have they remained the same over the years?For the readers who have never heard the bands music how would you best describe the bands
musicial style?
The influence of early Ulver, Marduk and Kvist ir probably undeniable, however everything you listen to influences your playing in some way. Everytime I add another album to the collection, their influence will get added to the mix. As chief lyricist, i'm influenced by the books I read and news too, despite the main lyrical content residing as 'dark fantasy'.
I personally would describe the musical style as 'streamlined, abrasive black metal'. Its fast and straight forward, but we do lend space and time for atmosphere and breathing, these are the things that truly make a good album great - the juxtaposition of silence. There is a death metal influence on the overall sound, but progressive and classical musics also contribute to the colours within our various releases. Guitarist Bane is a season ticket holder of the local symphony orchestra, for instance.

5.Acts Of Repentance is the bands newest full-length which is being released in March through Transcending Obscurity Rec. when did you and the band first come in contact with this great label?
Kunal contacted us a couple of years back, when we were still tracking the instruments for 'Acts...', and he was keen to sign us, based on our tenure and track record, I suppose. But until we had our new product finished and ready to go, or near enough, we didn't feel comfortable in signing anything. We didn't feel as though the added pressure of a label worked in our favour - but once we had the record ready to go, we put it forward and signed on the line.

6.Does the whole band take part in the writing the process or does or does one member usually write everything? How long does it usually take to complete one song?
Blitz wrote the whole 'Acts...' album when we were finishing recording 'Obsequium' in 2014. He presented the finished songs whole, all at the same time, rather than drip feeding ideas and submitting half finished riffs - which I personally hate. This method brooks no argument, and the songs changed nearly not at all from the original files. Drums were obviously polished and lead ideas were added, but the structure, riffs and tempos all stayed constant.

7.Who usually handles writing the lyrics for the music and what are some topics the band wrote about on the new release?
The only writing aspect not handled by Blitz are the lyirics, which is my domain. Long a student of the English language and an avid reader, i've always felt that lyric writing came naturally. I usually map out a concept for the album, or individual songs, then write lyrics, syllabically based on what i'm able to do on the drums simultaneously. It's not a totally foreign concept, as i've always thought Chuck from Death wrote his vocals based on what the drums are doing, making most of those songs (relatively) easy to sing and play drums to.

8.Besides the upcoming Acts Of Repentance are the bands previous releases still available for the readers to purchase?Does the band have any other merchandise currently available if yes what is available and where can the readers buy it?
Everything we've done, release wise, is available from our Bandcamp, except the original "From the Dank, Pale Gravelands" debut CD, which sold out it's original pressing of 500. You may find our discs, digital music and other merchandise at www.bandcamp.com/wardaemonic

9.Has Wardaemonic gotten to play very many live shows over the years or do you prefer working in the studio?What have been some of the bands most memorable shows over the years?
We've played under a hundred live shows in our 14 years, I would wager. Playing live is an integral part of being in this band, but as the band has aged, live shows have declined somewhat, we're more reluctant to play frequently and prefer to remain exclusive and elusive.
My personal favourites would be: Behemoth support (Perth 2006), MartyrDoom Fest (New York, 2013), Impiety support (Singapore 2015), Brutalize The Darkness Festival (Jakarta, 2015) and Enslaved support (Perth 2019).

10.Are their any tours or shows planned in support of the new release? If yes where will the band be playing and who are some bands you will be sharing the stage with?
We'll have to tour this new one, for sure. But as to prospective dates, supports or any other questions, we'll have to wait and see. We have nothing booked at this point.. I'd like to go back and play some cities we've already done, personally. Maybe Asia or the USA (once our dollar improves).

11.Wardaemonic comes out of the legendary Australian black metal scene what is your opinion of Australia's black metal scene over the years?
We're proud to have long been a part of this grandiose and incredible scene, strewn with amazing artists at every juncture. It's been difficult to see a lot of our contemporaries fall by the way-side, one by one, as bands age and die, they haven't been replace with many new ones. There are a couple of bands up-and-coming who are note worthy, foremost Christ Dismembered, but most of what we're seeing is blackgaze, shoegaze, DSBM, blackened-core and lots of other subgenres, which quite honestly - aren't cutting it. Not enough bands want to look awful and blast relentlessly, there's too much focus on dress sense, haircuts and merch designs. I know there's a market for it, but like all trends within this genre of ours - it'll wear out.

12.Who are your all-time favorite Australian black metal bands and are their any new bands you feel the readers should check out soon?
We're big fans of Arketh, Destroyer 666, Bloodlust, Astriaal, Bastardizer and others. Some of our deceased mates, like Order of Orias and Erebus Enthroned, are worth checking, but they won't be putting anything new out, i'm certain.

13.What does Black Metal mean to you?
Black Metal is passion and attitude. As long as you're doing it for the right reasons, it comes across in your writing and performance. If being moody and edgy is your goal, then there are other genres and pursuits which might suit you better.

14.Besides working in Wardaemonic do you or any of the members currently work with any other bands or solo projects? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
Oh, where to start. Bane has been playing in The Uncreation since the turn of the milennium. Blitz plays for Iniquitous Monolith, which is brutal death, and also DeathFuckingCunt, which is technical death. Maelstrom has played for most metal acts around the state, plus live tours for Incantation (USA) and Impiety (SG), but his favourite band to record for is UrDraugr, which has a new release soon.

15.Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?
No.

Wardaemonic,Perth, Australia
Band Contacts
https://wardaemonic.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Wardaemonic
Label Contacts
https://tometal.com/
https://transcendingobscurity.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/transcendingobscurityrecords
https://twitter.com/transcendingobs

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Interview with Maudiir done by Patrick posted on 2-25-20

Interview with F.vocalist and all instruments of Maudiir  done by Patrick

1. Hello F. how are things going in Canada this week? Please introduce yourself to the readers?
 Hi, it’s going well, winter is slowly coming to an end here. I always prefer summer. To introduce myself, I’m F. the leader of the one-man black-thrash metal band Maudiir.

2. When did you first discover black metal and who were some of the first bands you listened to? Are there any current bands that have caught your attention?
 A few years ago, I was a fan of symphonic black metal bands like Cradle of Filth and Dimmu Borgir. I still like Cradle of Filth, but don’t follow them that much anymore. I discovered the Norwegian black metal bands only in recent years, searching for a “fresh” sound, different from all the modern metal bands that in my opinion end up sounding pretty much all the same, mainly due to the same ‘pitch and pocketed’ brick wall production. These days, I’m really into bands like Taake, Mayhem, Satyricon, MGLA, and the band Obsequiae that I love very much; brilliant music I think.  

3. When did you first get the idea to start Maudiir and are satisfied with how things have progressed with the band so far? How did you choose Maudiir as the band name?
 I started Maudiir in Montreal at the end of 2018. After working with various people in different projects, I needed to do something on my own. I’m satisfied with the interest I’m getting so far, people really seem to appreciate the project and I’m getting really nice reviews. The name Maudiir is derived from the French word ‘maudire’, which means ‘to curse’. My brother and a few of his good friends got together and came up with the name. I thought it was quite fitting with the lyrics of the songs and the general mood of the music. 

4. F. I believe you are the sole member of the band, did you plan to work alone or would you like to find more musicians to make a full line-up? 
I planned to work on this alone to be able to depend only on myself and eliminate compromise as best I could. Of course, if ever I decide to play the music live, I’ll have to find musicians to do it. I already know a couple of people that would be interested, so we’ll see. For now, I’m comfortable working alone on new songs for the next EP.

5. What do you feel is the easiest and hardest part about being a one-man band?
 Writing and recording everything by oneself is a lot of work, but it’s actually much faster than waiting around for people to do their parts, which I did a lot in other projects. Also, there is no chance of people quitting after a while, which I also experienced. I’d say the hardest thing about being in a one-man band is resolving problems or arrangements in songs alone. Having more than one brain trying to come up with ideas helps, but it can also change the direction of a song drastically, and not always for the better. I usually send the songs to a few people I trust, to have their opinion, if I have a doubt about some part needing to be reworked.

6. Le Temps Peste is the debut EP. which is being self-released would you like to find a label to work with on future releases or do you prefer to self-release your music?
 I might be interested in a label in the future, if only for the distribution side of things, but I’m not really looking for one as it is time-consuming and I’ll put my time elsewhere.

7. How long did it take you to write the music on the debut release? How long does it usually take to complete one song?
 It was much longer to mix the EP than to write and record it, honestly. Mixing and mastering is an art, and I don’t profess to be a professional at all. I started writing the  first song ‘Wasteland’ in November 2018, and the last song ‘Snakes of Creation’ was finished in August 2019. But then, there was a lot of tweaking around the mixes, and I kept coming back on the middle part of ‘Snakes of Creation’, which proved difficult to arrange properly, transitioning from a fast blast beats section to a reflective mood section. That song seems to be a favorite in a lot of reviews, so I guess I might have gotten it right. I’ve noticed that it usually takes me about a month from having a new guitar riff to having a complete recorded finished song.

8. Where do you draw inspiration for the lyrics and what are some subjects you wrote about on the debut release? Which usually comes first the music or the lyrics? 
Consumer society, religion, science going awry, addiction to technology, environmental decay. It’s really about day to day life and what’s happening on the news. The music always comes first. The lyrics I often write at the same time I’m recording the vocals, starting on a general subject and going with the flow of the music. I find that writing lyrics independently from the music, I end up with sentences that need to be cut or reworked because the rhythm of the words doesn’t work when recording.

9. Besides the Le Temps Peste does the band have any other merchandise currently available? If yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it? 
As of now, the music is the only available merchandise.

10. What does black metal mean to you?
 With black metal, I feel everybody is doing whatever they want without too much care for the mainstream, and there is still a spirit of rebellion and freedom; maybe the only true metal spirit left?

11. Maudiir comes out of Canada's black, thrash metal scene, what is your opinion of Canada's metal scene? 
It’s great! A lot of nice bands in different metal styles. The Quebec black metal scene I think is especially gaining attention worldwide, with bands like Forteresse, Monarque, Gris, Délétère, Trépas ,Ossuaire… Lots of really great bands are coming out or having been around for a while already.

12. Who are your all-time favorite bands coming out of Canada and are there any new bands you feel the readers should check out soon? 
Rush is my absolutely favorite Canadian band without a doubt. It’s always been there with me. For Quebec black metal, people should check out the releases of Sepulchral Productions. I also love the older material of Devin Townsend; Terria, Ocean Machine… A true Canadian musical genius.

13. Besides working in Maudiir do you currently work with any other bands or solo projects? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
 I am also in the prog-thrash band Trinity Blast. We have released 2 new singles at the beginning of the year. And I play guitar in the Iron Maiden tribute band ‘Made In Iron’.

14. When you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you like to do in your free time?
 I watch TV series. There is a lot of quality series nowadays.

15. Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out, do you have any final comments for the readers?
 Thank you very much for your interest in me and Maudiir, it is very much appreciated.
Band Contacts