Thursday, May 14, 2020

Death Courier--Necrotic Verses cd{Transcending Obscurity Rec.} posted on 5-14-20


Death Courier--Necrotic Verses cd{Transcending Obscurity Rec.}
Coming out of Greece's death,thrash metal scene is Death Courier with their latest full-length.Necrotic Verses contains ten songs of old-school death metal with a health dose of thrash metal influences.The guitars are played with some very well written and performed structures.For the most part the guitars are played with fast and aggressive patterns but do slow to a more calm mid paced range.The guitarist does write some memorable guitar passages even adding in some well performed solo's.
The vocals are old-school death metal growls and some gruff growls are used in a few of the songs.
 Death Courier play a very aggressive form of death metal with some great thrash influences entertwined into the bands sound.If you are a fan of early Malevolent Creation,Obituary and the like then do yourself a favor and pick up a copy of Necrotic Verses when it is released.
                                                                    Band  Contacts
                                        https://www.facebook.com/Death-Courier-423460954403378/
                                               https://deathcouriergreece.bandcamp.com/
                                                                      Label Contacts
                                                              https://tometal.com/
                                                   https://transcendingobscurity.bandcamp.com/
                                            https://www.facebook.com/transcendingobscurityrecords
                                                    https://twitter.com/transcendingobs

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Interview with Foetal Juice posted on 5-13-20





1.Hello please introduce yourself to the readers?
Hi, we are Foetal Juice. A death metal band from North West England. We have been around since 2005 playing all over the UK and Europe.

2.When did you first get introduced to brutal death metal and who were the first bands you discovered?Who are some of the current bands that have caught your attention?
Me (Rob, drums) and Ry (guitarist) went to high school together and got into death metal at the same time with bands like Vader, Deicide, Death, Nile, Entombed, Vomitory, Kaamos etc. There are some great bands around these days. Mammoth Grinder, Teethgrinder, Scordatura, Burial, Wolfbastard, Live Burial etc. I’m personally really looking forward to the new Ulthar album too.

3.Foetal Juice was started back in 2005 what gave you all you the idea to start this band? Are you all satisfied with how things have progressed with the band over the years?
The whole point in starting the band was to write music that we want to listen to. I think we achieved that quite well, to be honest. I’m proud of everything we have achieved in the band so far and we are still hungry for more. We have managed to play a lot of cool shows with many bands that have influenced us over the years. Releasing “Gluttony” with Gorehouse Productions is another great achievement for us and we are confident it will open up opportunities to progress further.

4.What is the current line-up of the band? Who would you say are the bands biggest influences and have they remained the same over the years?
Our current line-up is: Me (Rob) - Drums and Ry (guitar) who have both been in it from the beginning. Our close friend Derek joined us on vocals in 2018 and Lewis joined us on Bass in late 2019. I would say the influences have been pretty similar over the years, and that ranges from a variety of extreme genres.


5.Gluttony is the bands second full-length being released through Gore House Productions when did you and the band first come in contact with this label?
It’s been great working with Gorehouse Productions so far. They have been on our radar for a while now. A number of our friends' bands (Scordatura, Party Cannon and Scum Pulse) are signed to Gorehouse and said very positive things about them. So far, it’s all been true. We consistently receive ideas and methods in which to progress, and it’s kept us busy and well organised.

6.How long did it take the band to write the music for the new release?Does the whole band take part in the writing process or does one member usually write everything?
We ended up writing this album really quickly actually. It’s generally me and Ry that writes everything. We were struggling to get together for many writing sessions because I’ve relocated to York. So instead of doing the usual 3/4 hour practice a week, Ry came up to York for 10 days and we ended up writing the majority of the music then. We tend to book the studio before we have written anything so that it encourages us to concentrate and produce things to the best of our ability. It’s good to have a deadline. Only this time our long-serving bass player Ben decided to quit about 2 months before we were going in. Me and Ry had to get everything written and find a bass player who was able to learn everything in time for the studio. We genuinely worked very hard to make this album, and we are thankful to the people who helped and believed in us during the whole process.

7.Who usually handles writing the lyrics for the music and what are some topics written about on the newest release?Which usually comes first the music or the lyrics?
We always write the music first, then structure the lyrics around that. Generally, we write about dark subjects that we can poke a bit of fun at. Black humour. This time I had some ideas that I told Ry about, and he wrote the majority of the lyrics, then Derek cut and edited it to fit his own style. Lyrically we have basically gone for a quite aggressive approach, singing about the greed, stupidity and cruelty of humanity.

8.Besides the upcoming Gluttony release are the bands previous releases still available for the readers to purchase?Besides physical releases does the band have any other merchandise currently available if yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it?
I think we have literally just sold out of one of our earlier EPs today - Big Trouble in Little Vagina. We have everything we’ve released up on Bandcamp either for free or very cheap download (foetaljuice.bandcamp.com). You can also get physical copies from there as well as merch. We have hoodies, t-shirts, CDs and all sorts for sale at the moment.

9.Has Foetal Juice had the opportunity to play very many live shows over the years? If yes what have been some of the bands most memorable shows and who have been some of your favorite bands to share the stage with? 
We have been constantly playing all over the UK and Europe for the last 15 years. From big festivals like Bloodstock (UK), Obscene Extreme(CZ), Extremefest (DE) etc. To squat parties in Manchester as well as everything in between. We have been fortunate enough to have supported some of our favourite bands like Entombed, Cryptopsy, Wormrot, Ghoul, Exhumed etc. As well as touring and gigging with local favourites like Desecration, Famine, Scordatura and Basement torture killings.

10.When bands are able to play live again are their any plans to play live if yes where will the band be playing?
I think we have been fortunate enough to be in a position where all the good things we had planned this year have been postponed until 2021. So, we have got a great year lined up. Hammerfest (UK) Nice To Eat You fest (CZ) Fuck The Commerce (DE) Stonehenge Festival (NL) As well as a number of tours and all-day festivals in UK and Europe. We can’t wait to get on a stage again.

11.What does Underground Metal mean to you?
It’s what we have grown up with. The underground metal scene has been a massive part of our lives. We have met our closest mates through a passion for extreme music as well as girlfriends. To be honest, I think it’s that ingrained into everything we do now, it doesn’t even seem like underground metal. It’s just life for us.

12.Foetal Juice comes out of England's brutal Death Metal scene what is your opinion of the brutal death metal scene in England over the years? 
The extreme music scene in the UK is really strong. We have got some really good bands in a lot of different extreme genres over here. From Grind and Death Metal to Slam, Punk and Black Metal. Bands like Desecration, Extreme Noise Terror, Napalm Death, Gorerotted, Lock up, Ingested, Winterfylleth, Fen, Necronautical, Burial, Unfathomable Ruination, Horse Bastard, Wolf Bastard, Hell Bastard, Crepitation, Party Cannon, Scordatura, Live Burial, Dyscarnate, Basement Torture Killings, Benediction, Akercocke, Pist, Discharge, Doom etc. It could go on and on.......but I just read the next question...

13.Who are your all-time favorite bands coming out of England and are their any new bands you feel the readers should check out soon?
All-time favourite English bands have to be: Gorerotted, Motörhead, Black Sabbath, Judas Priest, Lock Up, Napalm Death, Desecration, Benediction, The Beatles, Bolt Thrower, Queen, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin. Ones to look out for: Live Burial, Burial (their new album on Apocalyptic Witchcraft is great) Scordatura, BTK, All Consumed, Deathmace, Tuscar and Gets Worse. There are loads more but I really can’t think of them right now.

14. Besides Foetal Juice do any of the members currently work with any other bands or solo projects?If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
I’m in a Black metal called Necronautical. We released our latest album (Apotheosis) on Candlelight records last year and had a great response. We are in the middle of writing our next album now. We wear corpse paint live, but I’m really shit at doing mine so Ry takes the piss. Derek plays the guitar and sings in a crusty, Black Metal, Punk band called Wolfbastard. As well as a grim frost-bitten Black Metal band named Burial. Lewis is in a Thrash band called OND.

15. When you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you like to do in your free time?
To be fair, when we aren’t at our jobs, most of our free time is spent playing or listening to music. We are all fans of old horror films and having a beer or 12. Ry paints models, Watches MMA and talks to walls, Derek and I collect vinyl's and Lewis is a Black belt in Jiu-Jitsu.

16. Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final words for the readers?
Thank you for the interview and thanks a lot to all our fans who support us. Feel free to download our previous album for free on Bandcamp and share it around as much as possible. If you enjoy it, then you should check out the new album Gluttony on Gorehouse Productions.
Take care of yourselves! Cheers, Foetal Juice
Band Contacts
Label Contacts
https://twitter.com/GoreHouse

Sunday, May 10, 2020

Interview with Misanthropic Rituals done on 5-10-20


1.Hails please introduce yourself to the readers?
BONES: I'm Bones, founding member and songwriter.
YMIR: Hails, I am Ymir. Vocalist/lyricist.

2.When did you first discover black metal and who were the first bands that caught your attention?Who are some of the current bands that have caught your attention?
BONES: In my early teen years I was really only into 80s thrash metal and didn't really listen to much else. At some point I heard Dimmu Borgir's second album, Stormblast. After that I remember blindly purchasing an Emporer demo at a local music store based solely on the artwork and thought it was incredible. For newer stuff I really like the most recent Sun of the Sleepless release and Elderwind. There's also a lot of random DSBM that I dig.
YMIR: When I was like 14-15, Dimmu Borgir was probably the first band, then all the 2nd wave Norwegian bands like Darkthrone and most importantly Burzum. Newer bands I like are Verwulf Tyrant, Windfaerer, Throne of the Black Moon, and I've really been digging Lord Furious. 

3.Misanthropic Rituals was started in 2012 what gave you the idea to start this band?Are you satisfied with how things have progressed with the band over the years?
BONES: I was recording music at home mostly by myself since the early 2000s, even when I could barely play. At the same time I was always joining full-sized bands that never worked out so after so many years I said "fuck it" and decided to start releasing the stuff I was recording by myself. The only thing I really suck at is vocals so I started searching for vocalists. During the early days of recording demos I was still in college and working as a food delivery driver, relying largely on tips. Nothing will make you more misanthropic than having a job that relies on human generosity.

4.I believe Misanthropic Rituals is a two man band would you like to find more musicians to make a complete line-up?
BONES: Anything is possible for the future but it's not really something I'm concerned with right now. I move around a lot and me and Ymir, although both from Monmouth County, NJ, aren't even in the same country at the moment so that would have to wait.




5.A Path Through Absent Places is the band's second full-length release how long did it take you to write the music for the new release?How long does it usually take to complete one song?
BONES: Our methods for recording this album were a bit unconventional to say the least. I wrote the music in a period spread out over a couple of months and didn't start actually recording it until almost a year later. My friend Ryan had superior equipment to mine so I had him record me and mix everything. He sure took his sweet ass time though.

6.Who usually handles writing the lyrics for the music and what are some topics written about on the newest release?Which usually comes first the music or the lyrics?
YMIR: I can only speak for the most recent release. For that the lyrics I wrote were influenced by the music first, which is my usual process. The topics on the new release are in keeping with Misanthropic Rituals tradition of expressing contempt for humanity. There is also a strong strain of wanting to return to the solitude of the natural world throughout. Imagry wise in the lyrics I draw heavily on the Nordic mythopoeic, Lovecraft, and generally what I see in the world around me.
BONES: Misanthropic Rituals has always been a harsh critique of humanity with some inspiration from literature and even science. Human Dirt was essentially about a natural apocalypse wiping out humanity only to have new life coming back after so many years, including a new human species. But for this new release Ymir wrote the lyrics so it was a very different process than in the past. I wrote the music and let him worry about lyrics and vocals.

7.Besides A Path Through Absent Places are the bands previous releases still available for the readers to purchase?Besides physical releases does the band have other merchandise available if yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it?
BONES: Human Dirt is available for download on our BandCamp page. We don't have any shirts or anything at the moment but we hope to in the near future.

8.Misanthropic Rituals comes out of the U.S Black Metal scene what is your opinion of the U.S Black Metal scene?
YMIR: My personal opinion is that there are many people who aren't very much into black metal meddling in U.S Black Metal. But that there are a lot of great American Black Metal bands.

9.Who are your all-time favorite black metal bands coming out of the U.S?Who are some of the newer bands that have caught your attention?
YMIR: I'm from NJ so Krieg is special to me, also Leviathan is immensely important. Weakling also had that great release, and Wolfcloak will always be special to me because it was probably one of the first times I got to see Black Metal live. Currently like I said, Verwulf Tyrant, Lord Furious, as well as bands I've played with like Raven of Dispersion, Athame, Xeukatre, Galare. Also any band that was on the No Safe Spaces comp put out by Verboten Front.
BONES: As far as American black metal goes, I really like Agalloch, Leviathan, and Judas Iscariot just off the top of my head. Plus, of course, Basilysk whose frontman did the vocals on the first two Misanthropic Rituals songs.

10.Besides working in Misanthropic Rituals do you currently work with any other bands or solo projects? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
YMIR: I am also the vocalist for the Black Metal band Degrader. We're a raw BM band from NJ. Lyrically and visually we draw a lot of influence from war, especially my time deployed in Afghanistan and our home area of Monmouth County, NJ.

11.What does Black Metal mean to you?
YMIR: Hate, war, Satan.
BONES: Ditto, pretty much. It's a philosophy that puts darkness in the foreground. The best black metal comes from a very real place.

12.Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?
BONES: Thank you. Check out our new album and remember us in the future. We're not going anywhere.
YMIR: Cheers, hope you enjoy the new Misanthropic Rituals release. 
Band Contacts

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Interview with Thy Despair done on 5-2-20



1.Hello please introduce yourselves to the readers?
Nephilim, guitars/vocals of Thy Despair, band's leader

2.When did you first get the idea to start Thy Despair and are you satisfied with how things have progressed with the band over the years? Thy Despair was formed in 2006 and has a long history unfortunately, it collapsed several times due to problems with the lineup. But in 2017, a new page of the band's history started with a new lineup and new material as everyone contributed something new, and the music of the band started to sound in a new key. We all are quite different but together we create music that we all like. I am happy to call all the band members my friends.

3.What is the current line up of the band? How did you choose Thy Despair as the name of the band? Band members: Elin - vocal Nephilim - vocal / guitar Strike - guitar Navka - keys Alex - drums Anton - bass
Initially, the band was called Thoughts of the Desperate and revealed the essence of despair in its lyrics. The first songs were written in the style of gothic doom metal under the influence of such bands as Sins of thy Beloved, Betray My Secrets, Tristania, Draconian, Estatic Fear. Later, the music became faster, instrumental parts became more complicated and exceeded the scope of gothic doom, but, nevertheless, the aesthetic melody and gloomy atmosphere remain the hallmark of the band until now. Along with the change in style, it was decided to change the name of the band to Thy Despair.

4.Who would you say are the band's biggest influences and for the readers who have never heard Thy Despair's music how would you best describe it?
 There are bands that influence our music pretty much like Tristania, Epica, but that doesn't mean that we sound like them. I would call our music as dark symphonic metal - this describes in the best way what we do.

5.The Song Of Desolation is the band's debut which will be released through Rockshots Rec.when did the band first come in contact with this label?
In fall 2019 we wrote them an email with one of our songs and received the answer: "Very interesting, absolutely killer stuff! Really impressed by the quality and the style!." That's how our cooperation started.

6.Does the whole band take part in the writing process or does one member usually write everything? How long does it take the band to complete one song?
 The music is written by all band members. Of course, if anyone has an idea and brings in a completed composition that we all like to rehearsal we start working on it together.

7.Who usually handles writing the lyrics for the music and what are some subjects you wrote about on the debut release? Which usually comes first the music or the lyrics?
 I do the lyrics for the band. The subjects of songs from The Song of Desolation album are freedom, war, legends, and mysticism. Music mostly comes first.

8.Has the band ever made a music video for any of your songs if yes which song did you do? If you had the opportunity to make a video for any of the songs off the newest release which song would you like to see made into a video?
 In May of 2019, the band has released a tribute to Game of Thrones main theme on Youtube. This release included a video of the most epic moments of the series with Thy Despair's unique authorial vision of how original music should sound like. The song also has authored lyrics inspired by Game of Thrones series. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4Pvk76doO4 For The Song of Desolation album, we have a lyric video for Falling Star https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0y9NSsIXdk and a video clip for Army of Dead which will be released on May 8th.

9.Besides the upcoming release The Song Of Desolation does the band have any other releases or merchandise currently available for the readers to purchase? If yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it?
In 2018 we have released our debut EP album in 2 languages: English and Ukrainian. You can buy a limited edition physical disc on our Bandcamp page https://thydespair.bandcamp.com/

10.Has Thy Despair had the opportunity to play any live shows yet or do you prefer working in the studio?
 Thy Despair gave lots of live shows in local clubs and some Ukrainian open-air festivals.

11.When bands are able to perform live again are their any plans to tour in support of the newest release? If yes where will the band be playing?
We are waiting when the situation with the quarantine changes to present our album live.

12.Other then working in Thy Despair do you or any of the members currently work with any other bands or solo projects? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
 Strike and Anton also play heavy metal in Black Cat band. Alex plays in hard rock in Azart band. Navka plays classic hard rock in Rising band.

13.When you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you like to do in your free time?
Strike, Elina and I like motorcycles. We spend a lot of time traveling on our bikes in Ukraine and abroad. Alex is fond of 3D-modeling. Anton spends free time fishing and cooking. Navka studies the cultures of Balkan peoples and grows roses.

14.Thank you for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?
 In these hard times stay healthy and support Thy Despair \m/
Band Contacts
https://thydespair.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thydespair/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxjj8ZIyz7_aume0OitMaxw
Label Contacts
http://www.rockshots.eu/
https://www.facebook.com/rockshotsrecords/


Friday, May 1, 2020

Interview with Forgotten Tomb done on 5-1-20





1.Hello Ferdinando please introduce yourself to the readers?

I'm Ferdinando Aka Herr Morbid and I'm the founder, guitar player, vocalist and main songwriter of FT.

2.At what age did you first discover metal music and who were the first bands you listened to? Who are some of the current bands that have caught your attention?

I started listening to hard rock when I was 8 years old in 1988 with AC/DC, shortly followed by other classic hard rock bands of the 70s and 80s as well as the main metal classics from the 80s and early 90s. I delved more into the underground stuff around '92-'93 when I focused on grindcore, death metal and shortly afterwards black metal. I'm not really interested in today's bands; I estimated the extreme metal scene quit being interesting after 2004 for me. 90% of the time I just don't like what's being released today and the best ones are still a copycat of the old stuff, so I'd rather listen to the old stuff. There's still a lot of bands from the old days that are missing in my collection, therefore I usually buy old stuff and I listen to pre-2004 music, or I buy new albums of old bands when they release one. I like my metal old! Only current/new music that I listen to from time to time is synth pop and rap/hip hop, or crust/hardcore punk.

3.Ferdinando you started Forgotten Tomb back in 1999 what gave you the idea to start this band? And you satisfied with how everything has gone with band over the years?

The first demo/mini-cd "Obscura Arcana Mortis" was pretty much older material that I originally wrote around '97-'98 for my previous black metal band Sacrater and it sounded more like Mayhem's "De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas" kind of stuff, but I put it out mostly to let the world know that I had a new project. I quickly realized I was bored of the fast black metal style that was popular around the second half of the 90s and I wanted a sound that was more personal and atmospheric. Also, I wanted black metal to be dangerous and unsettling again. Nobody was really playing a mix of the most eerie black metal and extreme doom and dark wave, so I figured I could do it. I was breaking new ground starting from a very limited number of influences. The whole "depressive" thing didn't really exist back then and nobody sang about the themes I was singing or had the image I was going to portray. It was quite unorthodox back then. The whole "DSBM" thing didn't exist.
The band went a long way over the past 21 years both in terms of stylistic evolution and popularity, still I feel we're extremely underrated. I always did my best and stayed true to the sound I like anyway, I'm proud of all we've done and I think we kept releasing quality stuff which always tries to break new ground. What people like or endorse is beyond my control unfortunately, so we soldier on and hope for the best I guess.

4.What is the current line-up of the band? And how do you feel the bands musical style has changed over the years? Who would you say are the bands biggest influences?
The band started as a one-man band, the other guys joined in 2002-03. Since then we only changed the lead guitar players, one in 2011 and the other in 2016. After that we went on as a three-piece in the studio and we had a revolving number of session-players for the live-shows. Last one is Joschu from the swiss band Chotzä and hopefully he'll stay for a while.
When I recorded the first album I was influenced mainly by Manes, Strid, Burzum, Forgotten Woods and Thorns for black metal plus early Paradise Lost and Celtic Frost, classic doom metal such as Saint Vitus and Black Sabbath and 80s dark-wave/dark-rock bands like Joy Division, Death Cult/The Cult, Christian Death and Sisters Of Mercy. I also always had a soft spot for southern rock and for sludge metal bands from the south of the US like Eyehategod, Crowbar, Acid Bath, Buzzov*en and the likes, as well as some punk/hardcore. I really have a wide range of influences and over the years they all found their way into my music to a certain extent I guess. I also never forgot my hard rock roots and they've been more audible on most of FT's material from 2007 onwards.
All our albums are divided by trilogies, it started out as a casualty but now it became some sort of tradition. Every trilogy features some sort of similar sound between the albums, even if we like to always make each album different; but if you compare “Songs To Leave”, “Springtime Depression” and “Love’s Burial Ground” they all have things in common and they’re all considered depressive black metal classics, “Negative Megalomania”, “Vol 5” and “Under Saturn Retrograde” marked a different era of the band, with the introduction of some clean vocals and more progressive structures and unusual elements, while “…And Don’t Deliver Us From Evil”, “Hurt Yourself and The Ones You Love” and “We Owe You Nothing” shared the increased heaviness of the sound and and sludgier elements. “Nihilistic Estrangement” opens the 4th trilogy so I guess the next two will follow in its footsteps, at least in the general approach, but with FT you can always expect some surprises especially since I’m the first who never knows where the next album will lead me.


5.Nihilistic Estrangement is the bands newest full-length how long did it take the band to write the music for the new release?How long does it usually take to complete one song?

This time during songwriting I felt the need to shut the world outside, be it fans expectations or band members expectations, and I just let the songs flow out of my hands onto the guitar, without thinking too much about it. I wrote and demoed the bulk of the songs in two weeks or so and the guys of my band then listened to it and said it was the best stuff I wrote in years, then I knew I had been doing the right thing. We did three rehearsals and went straight into the recording studio. I wrote lyrics along the way.
I never take long to write songs. I don't write often but when I do I usually write, record and finish a whole demo version of the song in a couple of days, featuring all instruments and arrangements.

6.Who usually handles writing the lyrics for the music and what are some topics written about on the newest release? Which usually comes first the lyrics or the music?
I usually write all lyrics and all music with a few exceptions for music, depending on the albums. On the new one I wrote everything. I usually write the music first but I write down some notes for the lyrics on my phone from time to time.
The title-track of the new album talks about reaching a mental estrangement from the modern world and from humanity, living in a world of my own. "Iris' House" (pt. I & II) it's a mini-concept about cancer or some other terminal illness; part one is about finding out you've got a few months to live, part two describes the last days in a hospice bed before you die. It was inspired by people I knew that got sick and/or died and the title comes from the name of a hospice nearby where I live. "Distrust3" (which means "distrust cubed") is obviously about my extreme distaste and distrust for people and relationships. "Active Shooter" is some sort of cinematic tale where somebody who's fed up with everything decides to take weapons and go on a killing spree. "RBMK" invokes a global disaster that wipes out humanity; the title refers to a Chernobyl reactor but it could have been anything, even Covid 19 at this point. It was written before it happened though.

7.Besides the upcoming Nihilistic Estrangement release are the bands previous releases still available for the readers to purchase? Besides physical releases does the band have any other merchandise currently available if yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it?

Besides our label's mailorder (Agonia Records) they can be found pretty much everywhere with a Google search, from Amazon and big retailers to underground distros, Discogs, EMP, Indie Merch etc. and some of the stuff is available also through our own Bandcamp page. Official clothing (shirts and such) are available just through Agonia webshop, from our Bandcamp or at our shows. Everything else you might find is probably a bootleg and should be boycotted.

8.Has the band ever made a music video for any of the bands songs If yes which one? Are their any plans to make a video for any songs off of the new release?

We did official lyric videos and visualizers through our label but we don't have official proper videos yet. It's complicated especially because our songs are lenghty. We did a live DVD in 2013 though.

9.What have been some of Forgotten Tomb's most memorable shows and tours over the years? Who have been some of your favorite bands that you have shared the stage with?

The 2012 tour with Enthroned and Impiety was pretty fun especially cause it was our first tour in a nightliner, we usually tour in a fucking van. We played with a lot of bands over the years and we often headline the shows so I really don't know. Our main concern is basically blowing the other bands off the stage regardless of how big, small or important they are. We also enjoy playing festivals usually, unfortunately it doesn't happen too often. Hellfest 2012 was a blast, Kings Of Black Metal was cool (where we did the DVD) but also last year's Metalitalia and Madrid Is The Dark  festivals were nice. Metal Camp was another cool one too. There have been cool shows all around Europe though; first time we played in London was great for instance, people went crazy. Also Romania was great. But really I like it everywhere when the place gets packed and people show some enthusiasm.

10.When it is safe to play live again are there any shows or tours planned for the future? If yes where are some countries and cities the band will be playing?

Technically we're rescheduling our european tour for October but we'll see how things evolve from now on. We are also due to finally tour the fuckin' USA but it also got postponed so hopefully sometime in 2021. We play everywhere we get paid what we ask and conditions/terms get respected/fulfilled. During tours, it also depends on the routing; we'd play everywhere but sometimes it's not possible to include all the countries in the routing.

11.What does Underground Metal mean to you and how do you feel it has changed over the years?

It's just hard to say what's underground in the first place. What defines underground? Is FT underground? To me underground in the 90s was the demo-scene, the unsigned bands. Mayhem, Darkthrone or Marduk were not underground to me, to make an example. So I don't know what's the underground now. These days I suppose underground is the Bandcamp unsigned bands; if that's the case, I don't follow it. Wish them the best but I'm just not interested cause I listen to old stuff. The way the underground changed (at least from how I lived it in my teenage years) is that there's no more tape-trading, no letters/snail-mail, no flyers, almost no printed magazines, no printed fanzines and everything pretty much moves through the internet, the social networks, streaming services, blogs, webzines and such. In general there's a lot more information available to young bands on how to make things happen and a lot more channels to spread their music, which on the flipside created an overload of useless bands who somehow manage to have an audience anyway. In the demotapes days you either were good enough to get a record deal or your band would disappear in about two years max. Also, now pretty much everybody with minimum skills can record at home and release poorly-produced crap on the web and everything in general is a lot more politically correct. Another thing that drastically changed is that back in the days a demo band could draw 200-300 paying people to a local show, which today is pure utopia. These days a crowd like that is already a very good one when you're a fairly established band. I don't particularly like the direction things are going now so I try to be oblivious to most of it. I still think YouTube and everything that followed was the last nail in the coffin of the underground as I knew it. "Underground" and "internet" are two things that never went along well, at least since ADSL exists.


12.Besides working in Forgotten Tomb do you or any of the members currently play in any other bands or projects? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?

At the moment I sing in a band called Formalist who released its first  full-lenght a couple of years ago, titled "No One Will Shine Anymore". It's very extreme doom/sludge with some industrial elements in the vein of Khanate, Burning Witch or Corrupted. Alex plays drums in Triumph Of Death (which is basically Hellhammer) along with Tom Warrior; he still has also his own black metal project Hiems and he plays guitar in the electonic band Kirlian Camera. Kyoo-Nam plays drums for Whiskey Ritual (black 'n' roll), Tulpa (crust/black) and plays guitar in Caronte (doom). Our live guitarist Joschu plays guitar in Chotzä (black 'n' roll) and in a number of other black metal projects.

13.When you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you enjoy doing in your free time?

I listen to music, buy records, watch a ton of movies, write reviews for movies and play retrogames on a C64. Sometimes I hang out to bars for some drinks.

14.Thank you Ferdinando for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?

Go get our new album "Nihilistic Estrangement" if you like heavy, dark and atmospheric music with some ballsy riffs. Support us also by buying something on our Bandcamp page since we can't play live now and we're broke as fuck. Come out and see us live when we can finally tour, cause we'll be on fire.
Band Contacts
https://www.facebook.com/Official.Forgotten.Tomb
https://officialforgottentomb.bandcamp.com/
Label Contacts
http://agoniarecords.com/
https://agoniarecords.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/agoniarecords
https://twitter.com/agoniarecords

Saturday, April 25, 2020

Interview with Plague Weaver done by Patrick posted on 4-25-20


1. Hails Thorn please introduce yourself to the readers?
Hi !!! Here Thorn (or more precisely RM - I'm using my initials on all Plague Weaver releases). I'm a person behind Plague Weaver, Canadian blackened doom metal from Mississauga, Ontario.

2. When did you first become interested in writing and playing music? What were the first instruments you learned to play?
It was around 30 years ago when I was a teenager. Everything started with 2 pirate cassettes I bought somewhere in a flea market - Slayer "South of Heaven" and Kreator "Endless Pain".
The next step was my first band with friends. I already played classic guitar ( when I was a kid I spent a few years in music school ) so the transition to electric guitar was fast. We disbanded pretty fast because everyone had different views about the genre of music we should play, but I was already hooked into music. That was the beginning

3. Are you self-taught or did you take lessons when first starting out? Are there any instruments that you would like to learn to play one day?
As I mentioned before, I had a few years in music school as a kid. After that, I learned everything myself. If I have enough time I would learn to play on cello - I really like the sound of this instrument.


4. When did you first get the idea to start Plague Weaver and are you satisfied with how things have progressed so far?
The original idea was to create music in the vein of old school black metal - everything that happened before Norwegian BM. My inspiration was mainly mighty greek bands like Varathron, Necromantia, Rotting Christ. I added to this mix my other personal inspirations and influences and Plague Weaver was born.
So far the feedback is generally positive. People seem to like the atmosphere I'm trying to create in this EP - I'm really satisfied with the outcome and overall progress.

5. Who would you say are the band's biggest influences? For the readers who have never heard Plague Weaver how would you best describe the bands musical style?
My biggest influences are old Rotting Christ, Varathron, Necromantia, Celtic Frost/Triptykon ( especially everything that happened after "Monotheist"), and Dissection. I also love bands like Incantation, Bolt Thrower, Candlemass, old Samael, and many more. My other inspirations are industrial and dark ambient/ritual music.
I think that closest description of my music is blackened doom, although you can easily find there a lot of other influences - I would say I always tried to be somewhere in between those genres - black, doom and death have their unique dark atmospheres which I'm trying to forge into one ...

6. Through The Sulphur Eyes is the newest release how long did it take you to write the music for the new release? How long does it usually take to complete one song?
"Through the Sulphur Eyes" was created in around 6 months. I started to work right after the release of self-titled debut EP. It's hard for me to say how long it takes to complete one song because I usually simultaneously work on more tracks at once. Because I'm working alone on all music, I need time to distance myself from everything I created so I'm jumping to another track, giving the previous one some time before I go back and finish it.

7. Where do you draw inspiration for the lyrics and what are some subjects you wrote about on the newest release? Which usually comes first the lyrics or the music?
Inspiration comes from various sources - music, literature, film, philosophy, occult, life ... Everything above creates a kind of environment where I can cultivate my ideas for music and lyrics. It's strictly personal space and it's hard to explain how it works - it comes naturally. And which comes first? To be honest it doesn't matter for me because I'm creating a whole musical and lyrical concept of song - I sometimes start with music, sometimes with lyrics, mostly trying to achieve the expected atmosphere of the song.

8. I believe Through The Sulphur Eyes is a digital release are there any plans to do a physical release soon? If yes when will it be available to the readers?
Actually "Through the Sulphur Eyes" is released both digital and physical CD, but due to Coronavirus promotion of physical CD is almost non-existent. Still, several distros around the world have my CD in distribution (the full list you can find on FB page). Of course, it would be nice if someone was interested in releasing it in other formats like cassette and vinyl.

9, Besides the Through The Sulphur Eyes release does the band have any other releases or merchandise currently available for the readers to purchase? If yes what is available and where can the readers purchase it?
All releases (both digital and CD) are available on our Bandcamp page. I have plans to make some more merchandise but at the moment I'm just waiting for the end of lockdown and we will see what happens next. As I mentioned before, CD is also available in several distros from the USA, Europe, and Japan, more details on our FB page.

10. I believe you are the sole member of Plague Weaver when you started this band did you plan to work alone or would you like to find some new musicians to work with?
When I started this band, it was just a kind of a side-project for me. Now it's my main project so my priorities have changed - I want to expand bands line-up and play live gigs. Probably when all this mess with Corona ends, I will start looking for members.

11. What do you feel is the easiest and hardest part about being a one-man band?
I think that both the easiest and hardest part is that you're on your own. I have freedom with doing anything I want to, and again, no one will help me with that. For me, the hardest part is to have a distance to my music - usually when more people are involved there is always someone who will tell you the truth about your music - if it's good or bad or if you need to change something - it's more team effort. One man band usually will face this kind of honesty in reviews.

12. If you had the opportunity to work with any musicians past or present who would you like to work with?
Hehe - its a really hard question, because I think that there are too many musicians in my dream line-up. But for sure it would be TG Fischer from Celtic Frost/Triptykon - their last releases are stunning and let's be honest - I'm under the influence of his music.

13. Besides working in Plague Weaver do you currently work with any other projects or bands? If yes please tell the readers a little about them?
Besides Plague Weaver, I have another project, Bisclaveret. Its more dark ambient/experimental music, over 20 years of activity I released many albums/ep's and played a lot of live performances. If you want, you can check bisclaveret.bandcamp.com for music.

14. When you need to take a break from working on new music or band business what do you enjoy doing in your free time?
To be honest, music takes the majority of my free time - I have regular work, family, kids and whatever amount of free time is left I'm dividing it between my 2 projects. I wrote 'majority' because I'm still trying to find time for other activities like books, movies ( I'm a fan of old horror movies, for example, British Hammer film ) and computer games.

15. Thank you, Thorn, for taking the time to fill this interview out do you have any final comments for the readers?
Thx for reaching me out !! My message for readers is simple - keep support underground music, especially in those hard times !!!
Band Contacts


Friday, April 24, 2020

Eternal Armageddon-In Light In Darkness In Hate {Self-Released} Posted on 4-24-20



Eternal Armageddon-In Light In Darkness In Hate {Self-Released}
After releasing a demo in 2015 Bangledesh's Eternal Armageddon return with their debut full-length release.In Light In Darkness In Hate contains seven tracks of blackend thrash metal with some heavy metal influences entertwined within the music.The guitars are played with a lot of skill and excellent writing ability.For the most part the guitars are played with fast and furious guitar passages.The guitarist does slow to a calmer,mid paced guitar structure with some very well written and played memorable structures.
The vocals are old-school black metal screams that fit Eternal Armageddon's musical style perfectly.
 If you are looking for a band that creates some memorable blackend thrash metal with heavy metal influences then do yourself a favor and check out In Light In Darkness In Hate today.
                                                                                Band Contacts
                                                                          https://eternalarmageddon.bandcamp.com/
                                                                          https://www.facebook.com/Eternalarmageddon